Leadership Styles, Models, and Concepts Briefing

This page provides a collection of common teams and definitions of leadership styles and models.  Each term comes with a brief, concise description and APA style citation.  It is a handy resource serving as a quick reference for writing research papers related to leadership topics.  These definitions are from two textbooks as cited.  In ether MBA classes or I/O psychology classes, graduate students usually need to write a few papers around the topic of leadership.  I intend to make this post a useful resource for students to copy-paste a properly cited difinition and term to your paper, to save you time and efforts.  I'll try to extend the content in this post and related pages.


Authentic leadership: A model of leadership that argues that leaders need to be true to themselves and to the realities that they and their followers confront. Amongst other things, this means that a leader’s rhetoric must match his or her actions, be meaningful rather than superficial, and correspond to social and organizational reality (Haslam, Reicher, & Platow, 2010, p. 243).

Charismatic leadership: A capacity to influence group members to contribute to group goals that is seen to derive from the distinctive charismatic qualities of a leader (Haslam, Reicher, & Platow, 2010, p. 243).

Contingency leadership: Contingency leadership model determines if a person’s leadership style is task- or relationship-oriented, and if the situation (leader–member relationship, task structure, and position power) matches the leader’s style to maximize performance contingency leadership theories attempt to explain the appropriate leadership style based on the leader, followers, and situation.  Contingency leadership theories attempt to explain the appropriate leadership style based on the leader, followers, and situation (Lussier & Achua, 2010,p. 487).

Distributed leadership: A model of leadership that recognizes that multiple group members (not just leaders) play — and need to play — a role in helping groups achieve their goals (Haslam, Reicher, & Platow, 2010, p. 246).

Distributed leadership:  multiple leaders take complementary leadership roles in rotation within the same self-managed team, according to their area of expertise or interest (Lussier & Achua, 2010,p. 488).

Ethical leadership: A model of leadership that argues that leaders need to focus not only on ensuring that groups are effective but also on orienting groups towards goals that are socially responsible and moral (Haslam, Reicher, & Platow, 2010, p. 246).

Identity leadership: A model of leadership (as outlined in Chapter 8 of this book) that argues that leaders’ primary function is to represent, manage, and promote the sense of shared social identity that underpins a group’s existence and purpose (Haslam, Reicher, & Platow, 2010, p. 247).

Inclusive leadership: A model of leadership that argues that leaders need to build positive relationships with their followers and ensure that all group members are encouraged to participate in group activities that bear upon the leadership process (e.g., strategy development, governance, goal-setting) (Haslam, Reicher, & Platow, 2010, p. 247).

Servant leadership: A model of leadership that argues that leaders need to serve the interests of their followers (rather than the other way around) (Haslam, Reicher, & Platow, 2010, p. 250).

Transactional leadership: Leadership that is based on satisfactory exchange of resources between leaders and followers. This approach assumes that successful leadership is contingent upon satisfaction of the mutual needs of leaders and followers (Haslam, Reicher, & Platow, 2010, p. 251).

Transactional leadership seeks to maintain stability within an organization through regular economic and social exchanges that achieve specific goals for both the leaders and their followers (Lussier & Achua, 2010,p. 491)

Transformational leadership: Leadership that is based on a capacity to develop and promote values and goals that are shared by both leaders and followers. This approach assumes that successful leadership derives from a leader’s ability to encourage followers to rise above low-level transactional considerations and instead pursue a higher-order sense of morality and purpose (Haslam, Reicher, & Platow, 2010, p. 251).

Transformational leadership serves to change the status quo by articulating to followers the problems in the current system and a compelling vision of what a new organization could be (Lussier & Achua, 2010,p. 491).


References

Haslam, S. A, Reicher, S. D., & Platow, M. J. (2010). The New Psychology of Leadership: Identity, Influence, and Power. New York, NY: Psychology Press.

Lussier, R. N. & Achua, C. F. (2010). Leadership: Theory, application, and skill development (4th ed.). Mason, OH: Cengage Learning.

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